Operations Article

Sean Lynch’s picture

By: Sean Lynch

You’d like to address a potentially sensitive topic with a neighbor, co-worker, or boss, and you dread it. It might turn ugly. You fear an unpleasant reaction.

Eugene Daniell’s picture

By: Eugene Daniell

Sponsored Content

Every day, quality and production process leaders must find new ways to improve product processes in a constantly changing manufacturing environment. For most companies, the low-hanging fruit of process improvement is a distant memory. Now, it’s all about seeking significant improvements in the smallest production details to lower process costs and raise efficiency and accuracy.

Timothy Lozier’s picture

By: Timothy Lozier

Compliance is a common term that is very broad, and many companies interpret compliance as a host of different items. It can be related to quality, safety, or operations, but it encompasses a long list of areas within the organization, including financial, risk, governance, sustainability, and more. Companies try to fit this broad category of compliance into a single term, which can be a daunting feat. However, compliance is not the only component on which companies should be focusing their sole attention.

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

Brian Vinson may have one of the best jobs in the country. Vinson works as director of engineering with AWE Tuning, an automotive aftermarket company that provides award-winning, handcrafted performance exhausts, track-tested carbon-fiber intakes, and performance intercoolers.

MIT News’s picture

By: MIT News

Although data scientists can gain great insights from large data sets—and can ultimately use these insights to tackle major challenges—accomplishing this is much easier said than done. Many such efforts are stymied from the outset, as privacy concerns make it difficult for scientists to access the data they would like to work with.

Mika Javanainen’s picture

By: Mika Javanainen

The September 2018 certification deadline for ISO 9001:2015 is looming. The updated standard promises to further streamline mission-critical tasks and information flows as well as better align quality management with overall business management. But to earn certification, organizations must first meet a long list of stringent requirements. For example, they must establish quality objectives, integrate those objectives into business processes, and promote the use of risk-based thinking.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

Providing wireless communications in a factory, plant, or other industrial environment these days means more than just helping employees talk with each other while they work. By eliminating physical connections such as wires and cables from a facility’s communication network, wireless technology offers many manufacturing, chemical processing, and municipal (such as water treatment) organizations a means to run their entire operation more efficiently, more productively, and at less cost.

Bruno Scibilia’s picture

By: Bruno Scibilia

Genichi Taguchi is famous for his pioneering methods of robust quality engineering. One of the major contributions that he made to quality improvement methods is Taguchi designs.

Designed experiments were first used by agronomists during the last century. This method seemed highly theoretical at first, and was initially restricted to agronomy. Taguchi made the designed experiment approach more accessible to practitioners in the manufacturing industry.

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

To any of his sports-fan colleagues, NIST mathematician and computer programmer Vernon Dantzler might have been somewhat of a celebrity. Dantzler had been a professional baseball player, and a star shortstop in the Texas circuit of the Negro Baseball League during the early 1940s, before the desegregation of Major League baseball. Dantzler also had a degree in mathematics from the Tuskegee Institute, and would later earn a graduate degree in the same field from American University.

Syndicate content