Pam Bethune’s picture

By: Pam Bethune

One of the newest parts of ISO 9001:2015 and related management standards are the concepts of context and interested parties. What do these mean, and how can you apply them to your organization?

What the standard says

When making sense of Clause 4.1—“Understanding the organization and its context” and Clause 4.2—“Understanding the needs and expectations of interested parties,” we first want to look at what the standard actually says:

Multiple Authors
By: Daniel Blake, Caterina Moschieri

Pulling out of a country is an expensive proposition for a multinational firm, but it is sometimes required for the corporate bottom line. If the host country changes laws or even expropriates a subsidiary, it is often time to leave or divest.

Anna Nagurney’s picture

By: Anna Nagurney

When we talk about supply chains, we may conjure up images of manufacturing plants, warehouses, trucks, and shipping docks. There is another, truly unique supply chain for a product vitally important to healthcare and life, and it is very volatile at the moment: the blood supply chain.

Robin Materese’s picture

By: Robin Materese

A catchphrase from a popular reality show goes: “One day you’re in. And the next day, you’re out.” For the purposes of the show, the host is referencing fashion. But the same could be said about science. With each new discovery or advance, an old theory or idea often becomes obsolete—or at least less important.

Tim Lozier’s picture

By: Tim Lozier

Sponsored Content

For quality management to be effective, a solid corrective action process is critical. ISO standards and general best-practice guides suggest—and even mandate—a set procedure and proper documentation for addressing and correcting issues.

Ruth P. Stevens’s picture

By: Ruth P. Stevens

Business marketers have much to gain from retention marketing. Business customers tend to be fewer in number, and each is more valuable—meaning you can’t afford to lose even one. But how do you keep your customers active and buying from you, vs. the competition? How do you prevent defection?

Anil Gaba’s picture

By: Anil Gaba

Whether predicting demand for a product or forecasting spot prices for a resource or currency, we invariably seek out subjective opinions—expert viewpoints—to assist in the information-gathering process in order to make informed decisions. If forecasters are too closely linked, less information can be gleaned from their opinions, and decision-makers are more likely to make costly mistakes.

Shoshana Burgett’s picture

By: Shoshana Burgett

D

uring the past year, I have interviewed many customers across a variety of manufacturing industries to learn more about their industry concerns, the design and manufacturing challenges they face, and the technologies that excite them. Here are some manufacturing and business trends to follow over the next 12–18 months.

Thomas R. Cutler’s picture

By: Thomas R. Cutler

Two words no manufacturing organization wants to hear: product recalls. By their very nature, product recalls are unpredictable events.

The cost to a company transcends potentially expensive litigation and settlements. Product recalls and the effects that product failures have on companies that fail to conduct proper design analysis before, during, and after the manufacturing process are often unrecoverable.

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