NIST’s picture

By: NIST

To any of his sports-fan colleagues, NIST mathematician and computer programmer Vernon Dantzler might have been somewhat of a celebrity. Dantzler had been a professional baseball player, and a star shortstop in the Texas circuit of the Negro Baseball League during the early 1940s, before the desegregation of Major League baseball. Dantzler also had a degree in mathematics from the Tuskegee Institute, and would later earn a graduate degree in the same field from American University.

Thomas Kochan’s picture

By: Thomas Kochan

Politicians have traditionally paid lip service to the plight of the worker, but with working class struggles at the top of the new administration’s fix-it list, we will likely hear them talking more than usual about the steps they will take to reduce income inequality or end three decades of wage stagnation.

Some of them will go one step further and voice support for unions and collective bargaining, both of which have declined at the same time wages have stagnated.

Christine Schaefer’s picture

By: Christine Schaefer

Last month, 2001 Baldrige Award-winning University of Wisconsin-Stout hosted a lively campus engagement session. (See for yourself via this video of the live-streamed event, which kicked off with dancing.) The university holds the “You Said... We Did” sessions each January to demonstrate its responsiveness to the input of its employees and students.

Andrew Sloan’s picture

By: Andrew Sloan

At times it can be difficult to have a common-sense discussion about the relationship between business and the natural environment. The discourse (maybe argument is a better word) tends to be highly charged, and the opposing camps seem to have lost the ability to listen to each other.

Mike Richman’s picture

By: Mike Richman

Our most recent episode of QDL from this past Friday offered a nice mix of content covering the pros of regulations, transitioning to ISO 9001, the human case for going slow on artificial intelligence, and some dam risk management.

Here’s a closer look:

Taran March @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Taran March @ Quality Digest

Before my bosses get wind of the artificial intelligence (AI) platform Quill (“perfectly written, meaningful narratives indistinguishable from a human-written one”) and decide its 18-month ROI would be a great exchange for my pay and complaining, I’d like to present this human-centric survey of where things stand with AI and manufacturing. Call me old-fashioned, but I don’t consider it a “narrative.”

Ryan E. Day’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day

Sponsored Content

In a TED Talk, Geordie Rose, co-creator of the D-WAVE quantum computer, said, “Humans use tools to do things. If you give humans a new kind of tool, they can do things they couldn’t otherwise do—imagine the possibilities.”

DNV GL’s picture

By: DNV GL

More than a million organizations around the world embrace the ISO 9001 quality management system (QMS) standard to guide their businesses and operate in the most efficient manner possible. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has recently updated ISO 9001 from its 2008 version; the 2015 date assigned to the latest revision reflects the completion of work by the various technical committees that contribute to major updates of ISO standards.

Roger Jensen’s picture

By: Roger Jensen

For several decades, manufacturers have been pursuing lean on their shop floors to reduce costs and improve lead times through waste elimination and process improvement. They have been less successful, however, in reaping lean’s potential benefits in their purchasing, planning, and supply chain operations, areas that promise significant potential improvement.

Jon Speer’s picture

By: Jon Speer

If you’re in the business of developing medical devices, then risk and risk management become terms synonymous with your daily operations. Your overall task is to bring a device to market that not only provides a needed function to a patient, but is also proven to be safe to use—maybe even used by someone who is near and dear to you.

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